4 Things I Learned From Self-Publishing

A person choosing a book from a large selectionIn the world of authors, no other subject is more mysterious, nebulous, and insane than self-publishing. It’s so nuts, there are a host of gurus out there with courses you can take (for only $59!) which will unfold the mysteries so you can claim the bag o’cash awaiting you on the other side. Well, I tried self-publishing, and I’m here to tell you what I learned, for better or worse.

  1. Edit, edit, edit. Since there is no one out there in self-publishing land who will automatically keep watch for misspelled words and grammatical errors, you have to make sure you edit. And then edit again. And then edit some more. Probably four more times. Then hire a professional. Then go through it one more time. It never fails that once you’ve hit the ‘Publish’ button, you find the typo on page three that says IF instead of IT, and you face-palm yourself, wondering how many people saw it, and how many other times you did that in this manuscript. The upside? You can re-upload content after you fix errors. Can’t do that with traditional publishing.
  2. You have to do ALL the work. There is no one to help you figure out how things work. No one is mounting a huge marketing campaign, or booking book tours for you, or hiring editors, cover designers, and so on. It’s allllll YOU. It’s time consuming and can be frustrating. Here, patience is key. Make sure you give yourself enough time, and don’t rush into anything. The book will still be there tomorrow. Chill out.
  3. You get ALL the rewards. The reason self-publishing is so attractive? Royalties. You get to keep anywhere from 35% to 70% of the money your book makes (depending on how you publish and with whom), and that is a significant amount. You also have full transparency—you see exactly how many copies sell, and in what format, so you can track what you are owed. It’s awesome. Publishing houses take most of the money your book makes to pay for things like marketing and book tours, while self-publishing leaves these costs to you.
  4. It doesn’t end after you hit ‘Publish’. That is only the beginning. You have to continue to market your book and find your audience, and keep at it. You also have to find time to write more stuff so you can publish more stuff so you can write more stuff so you can….you get the idea.  It’s a constant circle: write, publish, market, market, market, write, repeat. You will be married to this project for a long time.

There are a shit-ton of books in the world. What else happens when you hit ‘Publish’? Nothing. Abso-fucking-lutely nothing. Why? Because no one knows who the hell you are or what your book is! You must get out there and scream from the mountaintops that you have a book that people MUST read or their lives will be incomplete, and you have to get people to believe it. And this has to be true, so they tell other people. There are more and more books being self-published each year, so it’s noisy out there. But if you can be heard, then jump right in!

 

Photo Credit: Photo by James Sutton on Unsplash

One comment on “4 Things I Learned From Self-Publishing

  1. All so, so, so true. No one told me this when I wrote my first book. Oh, there were hints of it when I read that the average self published book sells around 150 copies (friends and family, and then the abyss awaits. But I could do better—-I just knew it! Now, four books in print and sales mostly to myself, I tell everyone that I was never in it for money (true), but because it’s my new age 70’s something hobby (also true). So my hobby is a money loser; but so is boating, flying, golfing, casino life, etc, etc. I don’t care, after all I have really good reviews: all tour and five stars. And I get to claim that while I’m a commercial failure, I’m an artistic success. Life is good!

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