5 Ways to Build Your Fan Base

Rock Concert CrowdBuilding my fan base is probably one of the most annoying and difficult things to do. It also creates a fair amount of anxiety, because being popular isn’t something I’ve ever had much luck with. Nevertheless, it’s something that has to be done if anyone besides my friends are going to read my work. And even they get tired of my writing eventually. But below are the 5 ways I’m trying to be popular build my fan base.

  1. Write like crazy. Write, write, write. If I only ever wanted to write one book, there would be very little chance anyone at all will find that one book. And an even smaller chance that a lot of people will find it. Keep writing. Keep publishing. Keep putting my work into the world where more people are likely to bump into it. And then write some more.
  1. I got a website. I’m not going to go into the nuts and bolts of this since there are so many directions one can go in, but I did my best to set something up that was pleasing to the eye and easy to navigate. It isn’t fancy. It does reflect what I do. I even keep a blog there. I make sure to keep my website up to date and engaging and make sure people can contact me and find my writing either for free or for sale.
  1. Build my email contacts. I’m working on this one. It’s really fucking hard. I don’t know why, but sending people an email from a list feels, well, kinda sleazy. Like I’m selling Viagra or something. But the truth is, I sign up for newsletters that are totally (okay, mostly) legit. Why wouldn’t someone want to sign up for mine? This way, I have a direct line to my audience (which currently stands at a whopping 16 people) whenever I have something to say (which, let’s face it, is all the fucking time). I try to send emails regularly. Once every four months is not enough. People forget. There isn’t one right answer for how often you should send an email to your contact list, but it’s somewhere between once a week and once a month. Right now I try to send something every other week. Do what’s right for you, then do it religiously.
  1. Set up an author page on Facebook. This is a starting point and requires maintenance. I try to post something about once a day. It’s not groundbreaking or difficult, but results can be slow. This is the long game, folks. Not instant stardom, so don’t be discouraged if you don’t see a ton of traffic for a while. I have about 100 likes on my page, and some of them I don’t even know. So I’ll take it.
  1. Talk to other authors. Especially those that write in a similar genre. Read their work. Let them read mine. The truth is, we’re all in this together, and the writer who doesn’t support other authors is in for a tough road indeed. But here’s where there is the chance for cross-pollination and synergy. Say you meet a writer, and you like them and hopefully their writing. You read their book. It’s great! Who are you going to tell? Your contacts and readers, of course. It’s not a quid pro quo kind of thing, but there’s probably a decent chance they’ll give you a shout out as well to their fan base. Additionally, it gives us contact with people who understand the joys and frustrations of being a writer, whom we can commiserate with, whether we need to celebrate or support. Either way, you’re finding more work that inspires you, and hopefully will spur you to keep writing, which takes us back to #1 and starts the cycle all over again.

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