Guess what?

So many people walk around this earth with no idea
how to communicate their gifts to the world.

But you, dear writer, have already found your language.
Now it’s simply time to trust YOUR voice.

With love and total belief in you,
Marni Freedman

Welcome to The Feisty Writer!

Ummm, what is it exactly…

A New Blog for Feisty Writers Everywhere

What does it mean to be a feisty writer? Is it for me?

Well…

  • Are you ready to take your career into your own hands?
  • Are you looking for ways to improve your craft without being bored out of your mind?
  • Are you looking for new techniques that will actually get you to the page?
  • Are you seeking a writer-tested-and-approved method to complete your novel, memoir, screenplay, or play?
  • Are you a severe procrastinator with a fierce inner critic?

 

Guess what?

We are your tribe.

Three Reasons to Write About Things We Don’t Talk About

The logo for the San Diego Memoir ShowcaseWhen we were brainstorming ideas for themes for this year’s San Diego Memoir Showcase, one theme kept circling back: Things We Don’t Talk About. People loved the idea, except for one cranky writer who came up to me and asked, “I don’t get it, why in the world would we want to write about things we don’t talk about?”

The question made me think. I didn’t have an answer at that moment, so I let it percolate until I realized that for me, there are three reasons:

 

  1. It feels like setting a big bag of rocks down that you have been unknowingly lugging around for years.

    I have to admit; I am sort of addicted to the feeling now. I love to “let go” of rocks before they pile up and become too heavy. One writer described her experience to me a few weeks ago as a weight off her chest—as if she could more fully take an in breath, and more fully exhale—for no other reason than she put down in words what she thought she would never share.

  1. The fear of people knowing your deep, dark secret—of judging you, and blaming you—it all sort of dissipates.

    The truth is, yeah, others may know, and so what?  We all have stuff we think no one will understand. Either they will or they won’t, but by facing the faceless monster, you are taking away the monster’s power. It’s empowering as you realize you don’t need to run anymore, you can stand in the light of your truth.

  1. You are speaking for those who feel they have no voice. 

    I can’t tell you how many times when a writer has taken a risk and shared his or her truth that someone comes up to them and thanks them. I hear sentiments like, “Thank you for putting my experience into words,” or “I had something just like that happen to me—I thought it was just me,” or “I feel less alone after hearing what you wrote.”

These moments are such full circle moments—we hide because we think we are the only ones with that kind of pain, then we share it—to realize just how many have experienced a similar kind of pain. By sharing what we are most afraid to share, we create community, spark healing in others while we heal ourselves.

For submission guidelines, click here. I if you have any questions, please contact me at Marnifreedman18@gmail.com. Please put Memoir Showcase 2018 in the subject line. I can’t wait to hear your stories about writing what you thought you could not.

Photo Courtesy of San Diego Memoir Showcase

Getting Present with Technology – Five Online Resources to Enliven and Inspire the Muse

A Tibetan singing bowl for meditationA while back an email came across my desk that transformed my day.  It was Marni Freedman’s San Diego Writers Newsletter and it invited her readers to reflect on writing for joy.

Just seeing the words “Writing for Joy (Just Joy)” made me smile. I read her post and remembered past years when the greatest self-care I could do for myself was to go out and get a new journal and get very present recording life around me. 

Writing as Meditation

So, I heated a cup of tea and spontaneously wrote about writing for joy. I wrote that writing has long been my spiritual compass, bringing me back to center, and encouraging me to investigate not only the external world but also my inner workings—that writing is a platform for deep spiritual inquiry.  I noted that writing, at its best, is about paying attention. It’s a meditation, of sorts, that enlivens my being and encourages me to look at the world with fresh eyes.

Yes. Writing can be all this for me. And Marni’s email got me there.

But writing, too, can easily end up on my “to do” list.  It can morph into stress about deadlines and worries about getting it right. When this happens, the writing doesn’t flow as easily. I think too much and write too little.

Inspire the Muse

This is when it’s time for an intervention. It’s time to stop and listen—to dip into the source and re-inspire the muse.

This might mean inviting a little unstructured time out in nature—such as going for a gentle walk or sitting under a tree.  Or doing something that nonsensically soothes my soul, like wandering through a thrift store.

But, equally often these days it means turning to my computer or smartphone. I know. It seems counter-intuitive to turn to a device instead of nature for solace, but in this day and age, it’s more than possible.  There are technology-driven resources that can enliven our soul—resources that bring us back in touch with the source, back in touch with Joy—like Marni’s emailed newsletter.

My Favorite Awareness Tools

So today, I thought I would share a handful of my favorite awareness tools—ones that take advantage of today’s technology, but instead of spinning me up, they help me stay centered. None of these require much time or any money.  They are free and available right now.

1.  The Insight Timer app:

 I have long appreciated and talked about the benefits of meditating with a timer. At its base, it is a simple app that allows you to set a timer when you meditate. A gentle gong signals the beginning and end of the meditation. It’s wonderful and you get a snapshot of all the other people across the world who are meditating with you at that moment.  “You have just meditated with 3,456 people.” It might say. It’s remarkably reassuring to feel that connection. And, Insight timer has so much more going on, if you dig a little deeper, including over 8,000 guided meditations! This is a jewel. I use it almost every day. https://insighttimer.com

2. Guided Meditations:

As I mentioned above, the insight timer has an amazing collection of guided meditations.  I have tried some of them, but I prefer to listen to guided meditations from some of my favorite teachers.  It isn’t hard at all to find these on YouTube through a simple search. Below, are links to a few short wonderful meditations by teachers I deeply respect and resonate with:

3. Virtual Meditation:

It is a powerful thing to meditate with a group of people. Sadly, it can be hard to do. My husband and I have begun participating in 30-minute virtual meditations through Cheri Huber’s Living Compassion. The process is simple and free. There are a lot of different time options. We participate in the 7 am PST calls Sunday through Thursday. You call into a number and sit on the line in silence with others until the bell rings.

At the start of the meditation a “Daily recollection” is read and participants are encouraged to say it aloud too. (You can download it from her website.) At the end of the sitting, there is a short invitation of something to reflect on for that day. So simple. So good. Cheri Huber is a Zen Buddhist Monk with a Zen Monastery Peace Center in Murphy’s, CA. But she is also a prolific writer. Check out her book as a starter “There is Nothing Wrong with You.” She also has mastered the art of using technology to benefit the Sangha at large.  Virtual Meditation is just one of such offerings. I will mention others below. https://www.livingcompassion.org/virtual-meditation-groups

4. Daily Peace Quotes or Practice Everywhere Tweets 

Cheri Huber also has a mailing list where you can sign up for a daily peace quote.  I really love this! Every weekday morning there is a peace quote waiting for me. I get up make coffee, bring it back to the bedroom and then read it aloud to my hubby before joining the virtual meditation. It’s really sweet.   https://www.livingcompassion.org/mailinglists

Cheri Huber also has a twitter program where you can receive daily practice reminder tweets through Twitter. http://www.livingcompassion.org/tweets

5. Facebook Groups 

Most everyone knows about Facebook, but I have newly discovered Facebook Groups.  These are especially great for writers who know their niche market. You can use targeted Facebook Groups to reach a larger audience and grow your platform.  A friend of mine recently wrote a little book called “Memories from My Log Book: A Bush Pilot’s Story.” He was new to Facebook but started a page to help promote his book. The author reached out to Facebook Groups around the world who were interested in piloting.

He was astonished to see his book skyrocket in mere weeks. He was getting contacted daily by hundreds of people! Of Equal importance, Facebook Groups help us play with like-minded people—to be part of targeted communities. Some of the groups I’ve joined recently have stimulated interesting conversations that have bled directly into my writing.

HootSuite has a nice blog on the subject: https://blog.hootsuite.com/facebook-groups-business/.  

Please comment if you use any other apps enlivenment and inspiration. I’m always interested in hearing what works for my fellow writers.

Photo Credit: https://pixabay.com/185211/

On the Fringe in Edinburgh, Scotland

The High Street in Edinburgh

The Edinburgh Fringe Festival grew up on the “fringe” of the Edinburgh International Festival, which was launched in 1947 to “provide a platform for the flowering of the human spirit” in the wake of World War Two. Eight theatre companies, disgruntled that they had not been invited to participate in the inaugural International Festival, came to Edinburgh anyway and performed in smaller venues around town. Both festivals still thrive. Today, the Fringe Festival is larger than the International Festival. In 2017, there were 53,000 performances of 3,300 shows, by companies from 62 countries. The Fringe offers open access to anyone with an idea who can find a venue. Last year it sold 2.5 million tickets.

Day One Fringe

The first day in Edinburgh is a blur. For the newly arrived, the time difference gives the whole city a gauzy filter—like watching a late-night movie through half-closed eyes. To a fuzzy, jet-lagged brain facing a shiny noon on the High Street, the whole place is impossibly attractive in an old world, fairytale kind of way. Also known as the “Royal Mile,” the street runs from Edinburgh Castle down the hill to the Palace of Holyrood House. Along the way, cobblestone passageways with names like Fleshmarket Close and Marlin’s Wynd lead off to courtyards or ancient market squares. During the Fringe, part of the High Street is closed off to vehicles, allowing performers to stage short snippets of shows and spectators to sample the wide range of performances available.

A Fairytale Come Alive

This makes the fairytale seem all the more plausible. That, and some of the people milling around are dressed in 18th-century costumes. You’ll see clowns, zombies, half-naked men holding up other half-naked men on their shoulders, singers, jugglers, and a decent number of metallic-painted people striking dramatic poses.

When someone approaches with an outstretched hand, holding out a colorful piece of paper, you have just been “flyered.”

“Come and see us, it’s great fun. A little bit romance, a little bit mystery. Bring the flyer, and you can get in for half price,” says a young man with a strong Scottish accent and burnished red hair.

An exiled Iranian playwright describes his one-person show in flawless English. He writes about a country to which he will never return in hopes of building understanding about the similarities of “home” in all cultures.

A smiling, silent Korean woman in traditional dress presents a flyer with two hands and a small bow. She is a member of a large dance troupe.

Holding the flyer, looking from picture to person, you might ask “Is that you?” He or she nods and smiles before moving on to the next pedestrian prospect. There are 3,000 shows in search of an audience. That’s a lot of flyers.

Day Two Fringe

“Excuse me, what are you queuing for?” By day two, you feel more comfortable, with both the vernacular and the process. Lines spill from ornate buildings with multiple shows going on at the same time. The answer sends you either to the end of the line or in search of a new one. There are no assigned seats at Fringe shows. Five hundred venues seat anywhere from 10 people to 600 people. The event spaces range from professional theaters that offer performances year-round to grimy bars and tiny cheese shops that host only one show daily during the three weeks in August when the Fringe Festival is on.

Site-specific performances can take you through the Royal Botanic Gardens, led by flaming torches as you watch Macbeth. Or on a bus ride to an ancient ruined abbey on the Scottish border where white-clad dancers enact an eerie tableau.

Day Three Fringe

By day three, you will have laughed and cried and wondered where this incredible event had been all your life. A show created with only shadows produced from an overhead projector leaves you speechless. A comedian from London has you laugh until you cry. A harrowing monologue from a woman soldier in Syria hits you between the eyes and brings the Mideast conflict into sharper focus.

You will fall asleep during at least one show. You will get a little pickier. A pretty flyer and a persuasive thespian are not objective—they are advertising. You learn about reviews and “stars” that are assigned by the many publications that cover the festival every summer. Some reviewers are seasoned experts; some are ambitious interns. You learn the difference the hard way—a rite of passage for any Fringe-goer. You will see a bad show, a show so bad you want to leave but as one of only five people in the audience, you fear the “fourth wall” could be broken by your departure.

This poor experience will soon be forgotten after a pint and a couple more shows. A word of caution: there is a limit to how many shows you can take in and still remember each one separately. Over-stimulation is common, often cured with whiskey and a late-night kebab.

Beware the 24-Hour Clock

The Fringe runs on a 24-hour clock, causing manic numeric hypnosis and the determination to get to that show with the ominous title “Chaucer in the Graveyard” that starts at 23:30—in a graveyard.

Some shows live brightly for three weeks and are seen no more. Others come to the Fringe because it is a marketplace. A chance to be seen and booked to tour Australia, the US, or other parts of the world.

Familiar faces from television, movies, and plays—Emma Thompson, Hugh Laurie, Flight of the Conchords from HBO, Trevor Noah of The Daily Show—have all spent time at the Fringe. Robin Williams was in a Fringe show while he was studying drama in college.

A sunny morning on the High Street may feel like a fantasy but being at the Fringe is a waking dream for a writer. Inspiring stories spring from the tellers—because they must be told. You leave resolved to keep writing the story you have to tell. And to bring it to the Fringe one day.

Final Time from an Inveterate Fringe-goer:

Organizers estimate that the population of Edinburgh doubles—or even triples—in August. Above all, if you are considering a trip, you should plan ahead. Finally, the most important thing is a place to stay; even if you’re only sleeping a few hours each night. Visit Scotland is a wealth of information with a database of accommodations.

Edinburgh is easy to reach from London, with inexpensive flights from multiple London airports. Edinburgh Airport is only eight miles from the city center. A tram runs between the two as well as regular buses and airport shuttles. No need for a car once in the city. You can walk everywhere or take public transportation to more far-flung venues.

You can book tickets to shows in advance. The full program for this year’s Fringe, which runs from August 3 – 27, will be released June 6. Almost 400 shows have already been announced. You can check them out at the Fringe website. The main venues, with reliably good shows, include the Traverse Theatre, Assembly, Pleasance, Gilded Balloon and the Underbelly.

 

headshot of Andrea MoserAndrea Moser spent 35 years writing for other people and organizations, from elected officials and civic leaders to universities and non-profits. These days, she is animating the characters who inhabit her first novel. She is an avid theater-goer, in San Diego and in Edinburgh, Scotland where she has been attending the annual Fringe festival for 20 years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos courtesy of Andrea Moser

Previous Posts:

an empty boat near a tiny island with crystal blue water

First Draft Postpartum

Finishing up a first draft? Here’s how to prep yourself for your emotional responses. You would think that completing a first draft of your book or play or screenplay would make you feel giddy. And it might. And it should. I mean, you have likely been working on this project for months or years. You […]

Continue...
a picture of a beat up truck in mud

5 Times to Ask for Help

Writing is a solitary pursuit much of the time. While this keeps me pretty happy most of the time (not having to depend on anyone, being alone with my thoughts, having no one to answer to), sometimes it can be a real drag. Sometimes I need to reach out and ask for help, which can […]

Continue...
A stack of books on the floor in Marni's office

The Books on Marni’s Floor

Welcome to a new, regular column here on Feisty.  Let’s dive right in. So, why are the books on my floor, you might wonder, and not on the bookshelf? Because I have run out of bookshelf space. I have found that the ones I am truly loving and chewing on and underlining like mad are […]

Continue...
multi-colored wooden game pieces

5 Unconventional Ways to Develop Your Characters

You already know the single most important question to ask about your protagonist: What does he/she want? With that alone, you can make it pretty far into your story. But then something happens. You realize you still don’t know your protagonist. Maybe you have some backstory worked out, you know her education level, even her […]

Continue...
a stack of rocks balanced on the beach

5 Ways to Balance Your Work Life and Writing Life

Most of us find it difficult to find and maintain balance between all the different parts of our lives. I often feel like one of those people spinning plates on every body part, including my nose and forehead. But really, finding the happy place in between everything (along with bourbon on ice) is the best […]

Continue...
a woman reading while sitting on the year 2018

How To Be A Writer Who Reads

As 2017 drew to a close, the Internet lit up with posts boasting how many books people had read in the year. Some were photos of meticulously written lists, others just a blanket statement: “I read sixty-six books!” That was the one that got me: sixty-six books—in one year. Were these children’s books? I wondered. […]

Continue...
Orange tabby cat sleeping

Judging the Cat

I’ve been watching the cat lately with a little pissiness. Judgment. It annoys me that he stays so apparently healthy and slender and happy, even when he loafs around so much, rarely doing anything but lick fur (urgh, ginger furballs going down), sleep or eat with one spaz attack between 5 and 7 p.m. I […]

Continue...
hand holding microphone with black background

Be Focused, Be Prepared, Be Committed – Steps to Take Before Hiring a Publicist

Most prospective clients who approach me about publicity are new authors who have never worked with a publicist before. Whether self- or traditionally published, the most common question is: What would you charge for promoting my book? My response is always the same: What is it you’re looking for? A book tour? Media coverage? Internet exposure? […]

Continue...
a keyboard with the word "create" on one of the keys

5 Ways to Get Words on the Page

Sometimes putting words on the page feels impossible. Like “I’m going to make out with Chris Pine” impossible. No idea why a kick in the ass is necessary, but the sad truth is, for some reason I need to get psyched up to do something I love doing. Despite this mysterious quirk, I try to […]

Continue...

The Unporridging

I’m working on a newish project. I’ve got characters, most of a plot, and a few dozen thousand words down. It’s enough to hang onto and wrestle with, and oh God is it better than the blankness of waiting for a new idea. But it’s not fully there. I want to fall in love with […]

Continue...

The Problem with Rushing

I moved to Los Angeles when I was barely eighteen after living in a town where my high school was within walking distance. This, of course, meant that I didn’t have much driving experience before I arrived in a city infamous for its traffic, road rage, and expansive grid system which tapers off into narrow, […]

Continue...
an index card that says the gift of 5 hours for writing

The Holiday Gift Guide for Feisty Writers

Do you ever wonder what to give your favorite feisty writer? It’s that time of year, and some of our awesome contributors have made gift suggestions any scribe is sure to love: Marni’s Writer Gift Ideas: 1. Novel & Short Story Writer’s Market 2018 is the only resource you need to get your short stories, novellas, […]

Continue...